Chalice, Ciborium & Paten

Price: P37,000.00

A chalice (from Latin calix, cup, borrowed from Greek kalyx, shell, husk) is a goblet or footed cup intended to hold a drink. In general religious terms, it is intended for quaffing during a ceremony.

In Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, Lutheranism and some other Christian denominations, a chalice is a standing cup used to hold sacramental wine during the Eucharist (also called the Lord’s Supper or Holy Communion). Chalices are often made of precious metal, and they are sometimes richly enamelled and jewelled. The gold goblet was symbolic for family and tradition.

In Western Christianity, chalices will often have a pommel or node where the stem meets the cup to make the elevation easier. In Roman Catholicism, prior to Vatican II, chalices tended to be tulip-shaped, and the cups were quite narrow, since normally only the priests would receive the Blood of Christ during Mass. Where all communicants now receive from the chalice, the modern chalices used tend to be larger. Roman Catholic priests will often receive chalices from members of their families when first ordained.

The chalice is considered to be one of the most sacred vessels in Christian liturgical worship, and it is often blessed before use. In the Roman Catholic Church, and some Anglo-Catholic churches, it was the custom for a chalice to be consecrated by being anointed with chrism, and this consecration could only be performed by a bishop or abbot (only for use within his own monastery).[1] Among the Eastern Churches there are varying practices regarding blessing. In some traditions the very act of celebrating the Sacred Mysteries (Sacrament) is the only blessing necessary; in others, there is a special rite of blessing. In some Eastern traditions this blessing may be done only by a bishop, in some it may be done by a priest. In any case, in both the East and the West, once a chalice has been blessed, it may only be touched by an ordained member of the higher clergy (bishop, priest or deacon). In the Russian Orthodox Church a subdeacon is permitted to touch the holy vessels, but only if they are wrapped in cloth.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chalice

A ciborium (plural ciboria; Latin from the Ancient Greek κιβώριον (kibōrion)[1]) is a vessel: originally a drinking cup, but later used to refer to a receptacle for the blessed sacrament. The word is also used for an element of church architecture.

The ancient Greek word referred to the the cup-shaped seed vessel of the Egyptian water-lily nelumbium speciosum and came to describe a drinking cup made from that seed casing[1], or in a similar shape. These vessels were particularly common in Egypt and the Greek East. The word “‘ciborium'” was also used in classical Latin to describe such cups, although the only example to have survived is in one of Horace’s odes (2.7.21–22).[2]

In medieval Latin, and in English, “Ciborium” more commonly refers to a covered container used in Roman Catholic, Anglican, Lutheran, and related churches to store the consecrated hosts of the sacrament of Holy Communion. It resembles the shape of a chalice but its bowl is more round than conical, and takes its name from its cover,[clarification needed] surmounted by a cross or other sacred design. In the early Christian Church, Holy Communion was not kept in churches for fear of sacrilege or desecration. Later, the first ciboria were kept at homes to be handy for the Last Rites where needed. In churches, a ciborium is usually kept in a tabernacle or aumbry. In some cases, it may be veiled (see photograph below) to indicate the presence of the consecrated hosts.

Other containers for the host include the paten (a small plate) or a basin (for loaves of bread rather than wafers) used at the time of consecration and distribution at the main service of Holy Eucharist. A pyx is a small, circular container into which a few consecrated hosts can be placed. Pyxes are typically used to bring communion to the sick or shut-in.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciborium_%28container%29

A paten, or diskos, is a small plate, usually made of silver or gold, used to hold Eucharistic bread which is to be consecrated. It is generally used during the service itself, while the reserved hosts are stored in the Tabernacle in a ciborium.

Within the Latin-Rite, the paten is typically either a simple saucer-like plate or a low bowl. A smaller style paten will often have a depression that allows it to securely sit on top of the chalice.[citation needed]

In more traditional denominations or parishes, altar servers may also use a small paten, usually attached to a short pole, which is placed under the chin of those receiving the Eucharist on the tongue; thus if the host accidentally falls, it would land on the paten rather than the floor.[citation needed]

The General Instruction of the Roman Missal lays down rules for patens:

“[Like the chalice, the paten]…should be made from solid materials which are considered suitable in each region. The conference of bishops will be the judge in this matter. Materials which do not break or deteriorate easily are to be given preference.

It is clear that patens and chalices do not have to be made of precious metal. Although this does not appear to rule out a material such as crystal, it would be considered unsuitable, whereas something such as ebony would be thought appropriate, and the use of a paten large enough for all is commended.

It is also used among Lutherans.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paten

Thanks to Atty. Orlando “Orly”  Mirabueno and his Family! May the Lord reward you with everlasting gifts.

N.B. We welcome donors who are willing to give two more sets of chalice, ciborium,  and paten.

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